BREAKING NEWS

10-21-2020     3 رجب 1440

Diabetes and Women

October 17, 2020 |

World diabetes day (WDD) is observed every year on 14th November, famous Noble Laurite Frederick Banting who along with three more scientists Charles Best, John Maclead and Bertram Collip discovered insulin. Discovery of insulin was a turning point in the life of people. Before the discovery of insulin, starvation was the only treatment available for people with diabetes and most of the affected people would die soon after developing the disease. Theme and focus of this year’s slogan for WDD is women and diabetes - Our right to a healthy future. In addition to some other commonly seen diseases, diabetes also is increasingly seen in women especially those from developing countries. Women face increasing risk of diabetes and its complications because of certain social, cultural, and economic trends. This is because of multiple factors; women live in poverty (by age 65, women are twice as likely as men to be poor); women lack access to health care; are overweight and do not exercise regularly. Stigmatization and discrimination faced by people with diabetes are particularly pronounced for girls and women, who carry a double burden of discrimination because of their health status and the inequalities perpetrated in male-dominated societies. These inequalities can discourage girls and women from seeking diagnosis and proper treatment thus preventing them from achieving positive health outcomes. In developing countries, higher prevalence of diabetes and obesity is seen in women than men. Prevalence of abdominal obesity (preferential deposition of fat in abdomen) also is more common in women than men. Multiple factors are responsible for higher prevalence of diabetes and obesity in women. Polycystic ovarian disease (disease of young girls, characterized by menstrual irregularities; excessive hair growth at unwanted sites; acne and small cysts in ovaries) is quite common, in addition to the above symptoms; associated obesity and insulin resistance predispose them to diabetes later in life. Women with diabetes have difficulties in conjugal life, difficulty in conceiving and upon conception are predisposed to repeated abortions. Pregnancy has an adverse effect on glucose metabolism. Pregnancy especially after first few weeks leads to insulin resistance and frank diabetes in some cases.

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Diabetes and Women

October 17, 2020 |

World diabetes day (WDD) is observed every year on 14th November, famous Noble Laurite Frederick Banting who along with three more scientists Charles Best, John Maclead and Bertram Collip discovered insulin. Discovery of insulin was a turning point in the life of people. Before the discovery of insulin, starvation was the only treatment available for people with diabetes and most of the affected people would die soon after developing the disease. Theme and focus of this year’s slogan for WDD is women and diabetes - Our right to a healthy future. In addition to some other commonly seen diseases, diabetes also is increasingly seen in women especially those from developing countries. Women face increasing risk of diabetes and its complications because of certain social, cultural, and economic trends. This is because of multiple factors; women live in poverty (by age 65, women are twice as likely as men to be poor); women lack access to health care; are overweight and do not exercise regularly. Stigmatization and discrimination faced by people with diabetes are particularly pronounced for girls and women, who carry a double burden of discrimination because of their health status and the inequalities perpetrated in male-dominated societies. These inequalities can discourage girls and women from seeking diagnosis and proper treatment thus preventing them from achieving positive health outcomes. In developing countries, higher prevalence of diabetes and obesity is seen in women than men. Prevalence of abdominal obesity (preferential deposition of fat in abdomen) also is more common in women than men. Multiple factors are responsible for higher prevalence of diabetes and obesity in women. Polycystic ovarian disease (disease of young girls, characterized by menstrual irregularities; excessive hair growth at unwanted sites; acne and small cysts in ovaries) is quite common, in addition to the above symptoms; associated obesity and insulin resistance predispose them to diabetes later in life. Women with diabetes have difficulties in conjugal life, difficulty in conceiving and upon conception are predisposed to repeated abortions. Pregnancy has an adverse effect on glucose metabolism. Pregnancy especially after first few weeks leads to insulin resistance and frank diabetes in some cases.


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© Copyright 2018 brighterkashmir.com All Rights Reserved. Quantum Technologies

Owner, Printer, Publisher, Editor: Farooq Ahmad Wani
Legal Advisor: M.J. Hubi
Printed at: Abid Enterprizes, Zainkote Srinagar
Published from: Gulshanabad Chraresharief Budgam
RNI No.: JKENG/2010/33802
Office No’s: 0194-2451076, 9622924716 , 9419400056
Postal Regd No: SK/135/2010-2019
Administrative Office: Abi Guzer Srinagar

© Copyright 2018 brighterkashmir.com All Rights Reserved.