Poor healthcare

June 11, 2018 EDITORIAL 67 Views
Poor healthcare

The hospitals in Kashmir are not only short-staffed, but lack diagnostic equipments and buildings. Many run from rented places, while those in rural areas are devoid of basic diagnostic facilities like X-Ray, ECG and USG. Due to this the burden on the city hospitals has multiplied manifold over the years. The lack of maternity and child care facilities in the district and sub district hospitals has particularly put a heavy strain on the Lalla Ded and G B Pant hospital. Other city hospitals including the SMSHS and Bone and Joint hospital remain cramped with patients as the health centres lack treatment facilities in the districts and towns. The abject number of doctors and nurses who are employed to tend to patients often compromises the healthcare. It is due to this that the mortality rate in Kashmir is very high as people crave for even basic health care facilities. The dependence on the private healthcare outside the state has increased the risks as many families can’t afford the high cost of treatment. The hospitals in Kashmir lack facilities in the specialties of neurosurgery, cardio vascular thoracic surgery, urology, cardiology to name a few. In the state due to the lack of health care facilities the infant mortality rate still remains around 24 per thousand births. The government figures only paint a grim picture. In the state there are over 5500 health institutions and the bed capacity of the tertiary care hospitals remains only 5000. At secondary level the bed strength is 9300. Due to the lack of indoor facilities, even the vital surgeries get delayed. The doctor patient ratio in the state is an abysmal 1:1658 as against the recommended norm of 1:1000 of World Health Organization (WHO). The government has dithered from filling up the vacant posts of nurses and doctors in the hospitals which has compromised the health care delivery. The claims of the state to allocate a good budget for health sector have proven to be false. The government should look into the lack of facilities and manpower which has left the health care centres crippled. There is a need that the hospitals are manned by trained staff and the district and rural health centres are equipped with basic and emergency care facilities. The improvement in the emergency care facilities is needed in the wake of the deaths during the protests at the sites of the encounters. The authorities need to relook at their priorities and adequately equip the hospitals to prevent the fatalities.

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