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10-01-2022     3 رجب 1440

India & UN

September 21, 2022 |

In a rare departure from established practice, India is being represented at the UN this year by External Affairs Minister Dr S. Jaishankar instead of Prime Minister Narendra Modi. Jaishankar’s hectic 11-day visit has commendably begun with a reiteration of New Delhi's deep commitment to multilateralism, a re-emphasis on achieving Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) for global progress, and holding several meetings with his ministerial counterparts from other nations. This visit is a good time as any to look back at India’s seven-and-a-half decades in the UN. In 1956, India’s first Prime Minister, Jawaharlal Nehru, very rightly highlighted the indispensability of the UN when he said that “even if the UN did not do anything wonderful” the mere fact that it exists is “of great significance to the world.” Most of us are aware of India’s consistent clamouring for reforming the UN to reflect the global realities of the 21st century, but we are also resigned to the fact that change will be frustratingly slow. As in the past, we can expect India to again orchestrate its views with diplomatic finesse in an increasingly multi-polarised global environment, without taking on potential baiters (like Pakistan & China) head on. Delhi must be praised for learning to moderately “explore and enhance” its diplomatic influence in a scenario of conflict, dispute and other forms of global scare. When it comes to J&K, it has learnt the hard way that the UN can never be relied upon to resolve it impartially. Hence, it has wisely opted to use the UN to focus on common causes like countering terrorism, neutralising global warming, confronting acts of colonialism, racism, nuclearisation, besides promoting environment conservation and equitable economic development. As in the past, we can expect New Delhi this time also to maintain its moral high ground on several pressing issues. It consistently continues to maintain and emphasize that the UN is not the right place to raise or resolve bilateral problems. Nearly three decades have passed since the demand for reforming the UN was first mooted. India is particularly keen to see the UN Security Council being more representative of the current world order, rather than sticking to its original format of 1945. Many feel that it is high time that UNSC consider inclusion of permanent members from the Africa, Australia, South America and the G-4 group of Brazil, India, Germany and Japan to be more relevant and efficient. The privilege of veto still remaining with the five Permanent Members - UK, France, US, Russia and China - no longer makes sense. This lack of progress on UNSC reforms rankles and must be questioned. Unresolved issues notwithstanding, India’s presence at the high table of negotiations for reshaping the global order reflects its position as a much respected and responsible stakeholder, despite its two-year term as a non-permanent UNSC member ending on January 1, 2023.

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India & UN

September 21, 2022 |

In a rare departure from established practice, India is being represented at the UN this year by External Affairs Minister Dr S. Jaishankar instead of Prime Minister Narendra Modi. Jaishankar’s hectic 11-day visit has commendably begun with a reiteration of New Delhi's deep commitment to multilateralism, a re-emphasis on achieving Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) for global progress, and holding several meetings with his ministerial counterparts from other nations. This visit is a good time as any to look back at India’s seven-and-a-half decades in the UN. In 1956, India’s first Prime Minister, Jawaharlal Nehru, very rightly highlighted the indispensability of the UN when he said that “even if the UN did not do anything wonderful” the mere fact that it exists is “of great significance to the world.” Most of us are aware of India’s consistent clamouring for reforming the UN to reflect the global realities of the 21st century, but we are also resigned to the fact that change will be frustratingly slow. As in the past, we can expect India to again orchestrate its views with diplomatic finesse in an increasingly multi-polarised global environment, without taking on potential baiters (like Pakistan & China) head on. Delhi must be praised for learning to moderately “explore and enhance” its diplomatic influence in a scenario of conflict, dispute and other forms of global scare. When it comes to J&K, it has learnt the hard way that the UN can never be relied upon to resolve it impartially. Hence, it has wisely opted to use the UN to focus on common causes like countering terrorism, neutralising global warming, confronting acts of colonialism, racism, nuclearisation, besides promoting environment conservation and equitable economic development. As in the past, we can expect New Delhi this time also to maintain its moral high ground on several pressing issues. It consistently continues to maintain and emphasize that the UN is not the right place to raise or resolve bilateral problems. Nearly three decades have passed since the demand for reforming the UN was first mooted. India is particularly keen to see the UN Security Council being more representative of the current world order, rather than sticking to its original format of 1945. Many feel that it is high time that UNSC consider inclusion of permanent members from the Africa, Australia, South America and the G-4 group of Brazil, India, Germany and Japan to be more relevant and efficient. The privilege of veto still remaining with the five Permanent Members - UK, France, US, Russia and China - no longer makes sense. This lack of progress on UNSC reforms rankles and must be questioned. Unresolved issues notwithstanding, India’s presence at the high table of negotiations for reshaping the global order reflects its position as a much respected and responsible stakeholder, despite its two-year term as a non-permanent UNSC member ending on January 1, 2023.


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Owner, Printer, Publisher, Editor: Farooq Ahmad Wani
Legal Advisor: M.J. Hubi
Printed at: Abid Enterprizes, Zainkote Srinagar
Published from: Gulshanabad Chraresharief Budgam
RNI No.: JKENG/2010/33802
Office No’s: 0194-2451076, 9622924716 , 9419400056
Postal Regd No: SK/135/2010-2019
Administrative Office: Abi Guzer Srinagar

© Copyright 2018 brighterkashmir.com All Rights Reserved.