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10-01-2022     3 رجب 1440

Kashmir’s Cultural Renaissance

September 20, 2022 |

Films have returned to the Kashmir Valley after more than three decades. The vales of Kashmir may soon be referred to again as the “Switzerland of the East”. Before the closure of all forms of entertainment, including cinema, in 1990, this region had a rich cultural and infotainment history going back to the 1930s. Lt Governor Manoj Sinha’s inaugurating of multipurpose cinema halls in Pulwama and Shopian, therefore, conveys an important message – that it is high time that the “doors of Kashmir” are opened to the world; that watching cinema will serve the purpose of broadening one’s horizons, education and moral compass. The UT administration’s target audience is primarily the youth, which is a far cry from the time when Kashmiri society looked down upon youth visiting cinema halls. In fact, right up to the 1960s, parents seeking grooms for their daughters used to make inquiries to convince themselves that the groom was not a cinema buff or a hotel going guy. Film prints would arrive secretly in Srinagar via the Jhelum Valley Road, or via the Banihal Cart Road (now known as the Srinagar-Jammu National Highway and NH1A). According to one report, the management of a cinema hall had to tell the government in advance about the films it intended to show so as to ensure that nothing was screened that could offend cultural sensibilities. The change taking place today is historic in the sense that there is now wider and greater acceptability of the creative arts. Young Kashmiris need to broaden their vision through knowledge and new discoveries, and enhance their value as citizens to acquire a better understanding of cultures that are beyond the UT’s geographical boundaries. This goal should be welcomed for J&K has had a very long association with the world of cinema. Cinema has a role to play in social change. Only time will be the best judge to determine whether bringing that “Golden Era of film-making” back to Kashmir has served its empowering and vibrant purpose.

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Kashmir’s Cultural Renaissance

September 20, 2022 |

Films have returned to the Kashmir Valley after more than three decades. The vales of Kashmir may soon be referred to again as the “Switzerland of the East”. Before the closure of all forms of entertainment, including cinema, in 1990, this region had a rich cultural and infotainment history going back to the 1930s. Lt Governor Manoj Sinha’s inaugurating of multipurpose cinema halls in Pulwama and Shopian, therefore, conveys an important message – that it is high time that the “doors of Kashmir” are opened to the world; that watching cinema will serve the purpose of broadening one’s horizons, education and moral compass. The UT administration’s target audience is primarily the youth, which is a far cry from the time when Kashmiri society looked down upon youth visiting cinema halls. In fact, right up to the 1960s, parents seeking grooms for their daughters used to make inquiries to convince themselves that the groom was not a cinema buff or a hotel going guy. Film prints would arrive secretly in Srinagar via the Jhelum Valley Road, or via the Banihal Cart Road (now known as the Srinagar-Jammu National Highway and NH1A). According to one report, the management of a cinema hall had to tell the government in advance about the films it intended to show so as to ensure that nothing was screened that could offend cultural sensibilities. The change taking place today is historic in the sense that there is now wider and greater acceptability of the creative arts. Young Kashmiris need to broaden their vision through knowledge and new discoveries, and enhance their value as citizens to acquire a better understanding of cultures that are beyond the UT’s geographical boundaries. This goal should be welcomed for J&K has had a very long association with the world of cinema. Cinema has a role to play in social change. Only time will be the best judge to determine whether bringing that “Golden Era of film-making” back to Kashmir has served its empowering and vibrant purpose.


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Owner, Printer, Publisher, Editor: Farooq Ahmad Wani
Legal Advisor: M.J. Hubi
Printed at: Abid Enterprizes, Zainkote Srinagar
Published from: Gulshanabad Chraresharief Budgam
RNI No.: JKENG/2010/33802
Office No’s: 0194-2451076, 9622924716 , 9419400056
Postal Regd No: SK/135/2010-2019
Administrative Office: Abi Guzer Srinagar

© Copyright 2018 brighterkashmir.com All Rights Reserved.