BREAKING NEWS

10-01-2022     3 رجب 1440

Revival of cinema a win-win situation for people, stakeholders in J&K

“A new opportunity for J&K admin to rebuild common man’s confidence”

September 22, 2022 | Ashok Dixit

Cinema has made a historic comeback to Jammu and Kashmir after a gap of more than three decades. To the UT administration in general and Lieutenant Governor Manoj Sinha in particular, its revival reflects a new opportunity to rebuild the common man’s confidence.
Opening multi-purpose cinema halls in the once upon a time terror hotspots of Shopian, Pulwama and Srinagar is a well-considered move by the UT administration to use the powerful medium of communication and entertainment to bind people long accustomed to fear, insecurity, instability and uncertainty together.
Cinema is culture; it oxygenates our lives like no other medium of entertainment or information. It brings out a range of emotions and simultaneously provides its watchers with a great escape from the real and monotonous life. It has the advantage of portraying events as they are and helps us to come to terms with issues of the past and present, and if you will, life lessons for the immediate future.
In the context of Kashmir, there is a belief that the return of cinema will start conversations, help Kashmiris to break the ice and socialise better. Communication across the region will no longer be limited to politics, socio-economic survival, safety and security, but will inspire broader thinking and imagination.
Exposure to different forms of cinema will help these long suffering people to connect with the outside world, make them more aware and help them to acquire knowledge for possible use in real life situations. With younger Kashmiris clamouring for a better society, what better way to do it in an increasingly interdependent world than through the medium of cinema?
There’s something to be said about watching visual storytelling on a large and wide screen. In Jammu and Kashmir, the re-establishment of cinema halls and encouraging film shoots in naturally scenic surroundings will renew that beautiful bond that once existed between the region and the Indian film industry, so much so that at its peak, Kashmir was quite famously referred to as the “Switzerland of the East”. As someone once said, “Cinema and its scale have that unique ability to sweep you away; get pulled in by sound and colour in a way that you don’t feel when you’re sitting on your couch in front of a TV at home.”
Many would agree that being with a group of people laughing or sucking in your breath during a moment of suspense is an out of the world experience altogether. Movie watching is an event, something that is a little more special than clicking on the TV or the next YouTube video or setting the next automatic play for an episode on your streaming service, etc. It is a cherished pastime, especially when you are with an audience that is knowledgeable and anticipatorily excited.
There are many who would still say that watching theatre (plays etc.) is a far better option to cinema, but the important reality is that in the last 100-odd years, cinema in India has gained more popularity because of special effects and technology. Getting to see the unbelievable, which is made believable through special effects, is not something that theatre can provide. Theatre remains rooted in reality and primarily deals with the human condition as it is, a feeling people sometimes want to get away from. Theatre forces a viewer to think. The cost is also a factor. Films give us more for the money spent, whereas a play may not. Cinema has become more exciting, more diverse and generally digestible.
The UT administration intends to open at least ten cinema halls/multiplexes each in Jammu and in the Kashmir Valley under its new Film Policy. Special provisions and incentives have been incorporated to encourage local youth to take up films as a career option. Land is being acquired to develop a Film City soon.
Indian cinema has always been a powerful medium for socio-economic and socio-cultural transformation. In the context of Kashmir in particular, it has served the purpose of giving a fillip to tourism and the hospitality industry. Therefore reigniting a passion for it in the minds of Kashmiris in spite of conscientious objectors and anti-entertainment elements, can be a major source of wealth creation, employment generation and also an effective tool for preserving its unique culture and traditions.
Kashmir has had a great legacy of film-making and a massive film loving population. Reviving cinema is a win-win for all.

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Revival of cinema a win-win situation for people, stakeholders in J&K

“A new opportunity for J&K admin to rebuild common man’s confidence”

September 22, 2022 | Ashok Dixit

Cinema has made a historic comeback to Jammu and Kashmir after a gap of more than three decades. To the UT administration in general and Lieutenant Governor Manoj Sinha in particular, its revival reflects a new opportunity to rebuild the common man’s confidence.
Opening multi-purpose cinema halls in the once upon a time terror hotspots of Shopian, Pulwama and Srinagar is a well-considered move by the UT administration to use the powerful medium of communication and entertainment to bind people long accustomed to fear, insecurity, instability and uncertainty together.
Cinema is culture; it oxygenates our lives like no other medium of entertainment or information. It brings out a range of emotions and simultaneously provides its watchers with a great escape from the real and monotonous life. It has the advantage of portraying events as they are and helps us to come to terms with issues of the past and present, and if you will, life lessons for the immediate future.
In the context of Kashmir, there is a belief that the return of cinema will start conversations, help Kashmiris to break the ice and socialise better. Communication across the region will no longer be limited to politics, socio-economic survival, safety and security, but will inspire broader thinking and imagination.
Exposure to different forms of cinema will help these long suffering people to connect with the outside world, make them more aware and help them to acquire knowledge for possible use in real life situations. With younger Kashmiris clamouring for a better society, what better way to do it in an increasingly interdependent world than through the medium of cinema?
There’s something to be said about watching visual storytelling on a large and wide screen. In Jammu and Kashmir, the re-establishment of cinema halls and encouraging film shoots in naturally scenic surroundings will renew that beautiful bond that once existed between the region and the Indian film industry, so much so that at its peak, Kashmir was quite famously referred to as the “Switzerland of the East”. As someone once said, “Cinema and its scale have that unique ability to sweep you away; get pulled in by sound and colour in a way that you don’t feel when you’re sitting on your couch in front of a TV at home.”
Many would agree that being with a group of people laughing or sucking in your breath during a moment of suspense is an out of the world experience altogether. Movie watching is an event, something that is a little more special than clicking on the TV or the next YouTube video or setting the next automatic play for an episode on your streaming service, etc. It is a cherished pastime, especially when you are with an audience that is knowledgeable and anticipatorily excited.
There are many who would still say that watching theatre (plays etc.) is a far better option to cinema, but the important reality is that in the last 100-odd years, cinema in India has gained more popularity because of special effects and technology. Getting to see the unbelievable, which is made believable through special effects, is not something that theatre can provide. Theatre remains rooted in reality and primarily deals with the human condition as it is, a feeling people sometimes want to get away from. Theatre forces a viewer to think. The cost is also a factor. Films give us more for the money spent, whereas a play may not. Cinema has become more exciting, more diverse and generally digestible.
The UT administration intends to open at least ten cinema halls/multiplexes each in Jammu and in the Kashmir Valley under its new Film Policy. Special provisions and incentives have been incorporated to encourage local youth to take up films as a career option. Land is being acquired to develop a Film City soon.
Indian cinema has always been a powerful medium for socio-economic and socio-cultural transformation. In the context of Kashmir in particular, it has served the purpose of giving a fillip to tourism and the hospitality industry. Therefore reigniting a passion for it in the minds of Kashmiris in spite of conscientious objectors and anti-entertainment elements, can be a major source of wealth creation, employment generation and also an effective tool for preserving its unique culture and traditions.
Kashmir has had a great legacy of film-making and a massive film loving population. Reviving cinema is a win-win for all.


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Owner, Printer, Publisher, Editor: Farooq Ahmad Wani
Legal Advisor: M.J. Hubi
Printed at: Abid Enterprizes, Zainkote Srinagar
Published from: Gulshanabad Chraresharief Budgam
RNI No.: JKENG/2010/33802
Office No’s: 0194-2451076, 9622924716 , 9419400056
Postal Regd No: SK/135/2010-2019
Administrative Office: Abi Guzer Srinagar

© Copyright 2018 brighterkashmir.com All Rights Reserved.